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Akita attacks

There are many rumors about how much pressure is in the Akita bite. We have seen claims of a range of 400 to 4000 pounds of pressure. That is not true at all. Factually, all large sized breeds will range between 300 to 350 lbs. of pressure. This is quite remarkable considering that an adult human gives out only 120, although dangerous animals such as lions and sharks both are in the 600 range.

With this being said, the Akita actually exerts a bit less force than the Shepherd or the Rottweiler due to slightly different jaw structure.

Aggressive Biting

Being a guard dog, most (but not all) will first growl. This is a warning signal that essentially means “I am going to attack if you do not back off”. It tells us that the dog is irritated and on high alert. Focused on the task at hand, the Akita will rarely back off on his own. This will happen with this breed if the dog feels that what he is protecting is in harm’s way. This includes 3 elements:

• Himself

• His human family

• What he

considers to be his territory

Before we go on to training, let’s first, look a self-protection. It is a known fact that this breed is highly dominant and will not tolerate an unfamiliar dog, particularly one of the same gender. When an encounter takes place, all focus goes to defending and upholding himself as the pack leader (of essentially all canines) and this is when aggressive behavior will be triggered. This will often result in a quick and powerful bite or an attempt to do so, if the owner is able to keep control of the leash and hold the dog back).

Now, let’s talk about family. This breed is highly motivated, by instinct, to protect their human family members. This means that any person or dog or other animal that is interpreted to be a possible threat will usually first receive a clear warning via a growl and this will be accompanied by protective body stance. If the threat does not retreat, a bite is generally the next step. At that point, while having some control and understanding the situation in their own way, an Akita often will not stop at one, but there is often a succession of biting.

Source: www.akita-dog.com
Category: Akita

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