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Airedale terrier information

The Airedale Terrier evolved from the extinct black and tan type dog that was shown in very early art records, which sprang the Broken-haired or Old English Terrier. The extinct black and tan dog is believed to be the common progenitor of the Irish Terrier. Fox Terrier. Welsh Terrier and Airedale Terrier.

A mixture of the varying types and sizes of these dogs (ranging from 17-30 pounds) formed the roots of the Airedale. Then they were called Working, Waterside and Bingley Terriers. They were used by the Yorkshiremen for hunting the fox, badger, weasel, otter, water rat, and other small game in the valleys of the rivers Colne, Calder, Warfe, and Aire.

These dogs excel in agility, eyesight, hearing and courage, however they lacked the keen nose and swimming ability of the rough-coated Otterhound. They competed in chase with the Otterhounds. and this was the reason for crossing the two breeds. By doing so, they captured the best features of both breeds, and made a better and larger terrier, the Airedale as we know today.

Airedale Terriers were used on great game in Africa, India, Canada, and in the United States. They were among the first breeds used for police work in Germany and Great Britain. They were also used in several wars due to their ability to suffer wounds without faltering at the next order of duty.

Airedales have a hard, dense wiry coat. The coloring should be tan on head and ears, the ears being a darker shade than the rest. The legs should be tan as well as most of the body. There should be black or dark grizzle markings on the sides and upper parts of the body. They require professional grooming every 6-8 weeks. Males should be around 23 inches tall, females slightly less.

Airedale Terriers were developed to hunt other animals and can be aggressive towards other dogs especially those of the same sex. If raised with other pets there shouldn't be a problem, however they may not do well with pets such as rabbits, ferrits, and other small animals unless raised with them. Airedales love to chase fleeing creatures, so they should always be onlead

when outside in an unconfined area. If they are offlead and spot a rabbit, squirrel or anything similiar, they will take off in pursuit and will not listen to your calls for them to return.

In general, Airedales are very happy dogs and love to be with their families. They do well with children and love to play. They're not dogs who go seeking trouble, however will not back down if another animal challenges them. They will protect their home and family, and if they bark, there is usually a reason for it. They're not a breed who barks just to hear themself bark.

Typically housebreaking goes well- puppies of course should be watched at all times so that you can get them outside to potty when you think they need to go. If you do catch your Airedale going potty on the floor, give a firm "no", and take the puppy outside. When the puppy does his "business" outside, praise him greatly. If you find that your puppy had an accident and you did not catch him in the act, simply clean it up and watch closer next time. Never rub a dogs nose in his "mess"- all this does is give you a puppy with a dirty face. Do not scold the puppy for a mess that happened while you weren't watching either.

Start lead training at an early age as this breed will grow into a very strong dog who may pull you while walking on-lead unless trained not to do so. Obedience training is recommended.

Airedales are truly wonderful family pets and many times, owning one is just not enough- many Airedale owners end up adding a second Airedale to the family within a couple of years.

Start 'groomer training' very early with your Airedale puppy. Even if you don't want your Airedales hair trimmed, take him to the groomer for a bath so that he can begin getting used to the grooming routine, sounds, and the entire experience. This is very important for your Airedale! The more he gets used to having this done when he is young, the better he will be for it when he's grown into a large dog.

The main health concerns are eye problems, Hip Dysplasia and skin infections.

Airedale - PupMobile Magnet

Source: www.loveofbreeds.com
Category: Airedale

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